Bankruptcy Court Boots Man who Formed His Own Jury to Overturn a Judgment

Sovereign Citizens are kind of like watching a clip from America’s Funniest Home Videos: entertaining as long as it doesn’t involve you directly.
After losing two civil and one criminal lawsuit in state court, one such Citizen decided to avail himself of the protection of the Federal Bankruptcy court in South Dakota. If you have any familiarity with the typical court behavior of sovereign citizens, you can predict the results. He picked and chose the rules he liked, ignoring the ones that did not serve his purpose. His chapter 13 bankruptcy was kicked out: he filed a new one, and that case was kicked out as well. Here are some excerpts.

After the Debtor’s attempts to challenge the judgments in the state courts proved unsuccessful, he convened a group of individuals which he refers to as “the Peoples Seventh Amendment Jury.” The “jury” purported to void the judgments against the Debtor as being fraudulently obtained and also assessed punitive damages against the parties involved in the alleged fraud. In 2013, the Debtor filed the Peoples Seventh Amendment Jury’s judgment and other documents containing the heading of “Our One Supreme Court” in the South Dakota state court. The filing of these documents resulted in the Debtor being convicted of the crime of accusing a state court judge of treason and threatening the judge with death. That conviction was affirmed by the South Dakota Supreme Court. …
In addition to the arguments which had previously been rejected by the courts, he also now asserts that ConAgra and the political and judicial leaders of South Dakota have conspired to destroy his livelihood as an organic farmer and take over the food industry.

The court found that Mr. Paulson’s opposition to the dismissal of his second bankruptcy case was both untimely, and meritless. Paulson v. McDermott, No. 16-6018 (8th Cir. 2016) http://law.justia.com/cases/federal/appellate-courts/ca8/16-6018/16-6018-2016-11-17.html

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